Campus News

Spotlight on Student Academic Records

by: Timothy Patterson

An average nine out of ten students go to the Records office to ask University-related questions. The questions range from GPA to grades to graduation, and everything in between. Why does the Records office get so much traffic on a daily basis?

“We are essentially the University’s main office,” explains Dominique Penick, transcript clerk.

She goes on, “Everything that is related to the University goes through us. We handle everything academic, so students naturally come to us.”

“Even if our department does not have the answer to the student’s question, we still try to help them as much as we can, and usually send them to the department they are looking for,” adds Shemeka Summers, secretary to the Registrar.

Terrell Holmes is Delaware State University’s registrar, the chief custodian for all academic records. He explains that his job is make sure all student’s records are accurate and on track.

Terrell Holmes at work in his office in the Records department. (Photo: Timothy W. Patterson)

Terrell Holmes at work in his office in the Records department. (Photo: Timothy W. Patterson)

When it is time for graduation, each student is in the hands of the Records department. “We do all of the heavy lifting,” explains Mr. Holmes. “Your degree comes from us. If my signature is not on the degree, it’s not valid.”

Some of the many duties the Records department performs are: generating alternate PIN numbers for registration, changing majors for students, changing grades, completing the withdrawal process, Early College High School registration, standard University registration, building schedules, and more.

Mr. Holmes notes on the heavy traffic, saying, “We’re so connected to the rest of the University, so whether it’s Financial Aid, [Student] Accounts, or scholarships, we know something about it”

The Records department is located on the first floor in the newly christened Administration Building, now called the Clairbourne D. Smith Administration Building.

If all else fails, and you don’t know what to do, go to Records. They can help you for

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